iGlobal Talent Attraction

Identify, Engage, Attract

We help you identify, engage and attract the most exceptional talent globally.

The Global Competition for Talent

The competition for exceptional global talent is only increasing as international mobility of highly skilled workers grows in scale and complexity and more economies participate in R&D and innovation activity. Mobile talent diffuses knowledge both directly and indirectly across borders. This can boost global innovation performance, with benefits accruing to both sending and receiving countries. It is clear that mobility is leading to an increasing level of labour-market internationalisation and integration, and competition for talent is now influencing innovation policy initiatives across the globe.

Most countries offer a range of policies focused on assisting and encouraging mobility, although few have a specific and coherent mobility strategy. Many nations aim to attract the same pool of highly skilled talent; thus, relying on international flows to fill existing or future gaps in supply may entail risks. Addressing shortcomings in national policies that may limit the domestic supply of skilled workers, and ensuring that the wider environment for innovation and scientific endeavour is sound, are key policy challenges for countries.


Data-Driven Talent Attraction

At iGlobal Talent we use data to help companies, universities and governments to identify, engage and attract exceptional talent. Based on your Ideal Talent Profiles we search our database of over 1.5M global alumni and 40M global talent profiles to match your opportunity with the best talent. Whether you are looking for the brightest PhD graduate to join your startup, an experienced founder to set up their latest venture in your country or city or you are a university looking to attract the best post-graduate students to your program we take a data-driven approach to make sure your offer reaches the people that count.

Attract Global Talent

What does your Ideal Talent Profile look like?

The global competition for talent is intensifying. Many developed economies have difficulties in producing enough talent to deal with a rapidly changing future increasingly driven by innovation and knowledge. Bringing in talent from outside can provide a quick fix to the human resource gap. The international mobility of talent is not a new phenomenon, as highly skilled people have always moved to other places in search of better career prospects. Nowadays the movement of talent tends to be more frequent as economic activities have become more globalized and job opportunities are less geographically bound in a globalized world. What does your Ideal Talent Profile look like?

International Students & Graduates
Founders
PhDs

Countries Compete for Global Talent

Countries already have various policy initiatives to encourage and facilitate inward and outward mobility of skilled researchers, scientists and engineers. In the main, these initiatives involve funding for individuals but also include information provision and some facilitated administrative procedures, especially for immigration. Policy evaluation has become a central part of the management and governance of public support for science and innovation. It has been driven by factors such as greater recognition of the importance of science and innovation for economic growth and welfare and a desire to make effective investments in this area, a broader trend towards learning from past policy successes and failures, and a general push for clear accountability and transparency on the part of government and minimisation of distortions arising from government policies. For mobility policies, evaluation offers the chance to better understand the policy choices made by countries and whether they are efficient and effective, and potentially to point towards some best practices.

Among the economies expected to be hit hardest are Brazil, Indonesia, and Japan, which could face shortages of up to 18 million workers apiece, according to Korn Ferry’s projections. The United States and Russia are expected to be short 6 million workers each, while China could face a deficit of 12 million.

Investors & HNWI
Innovators
Female Leaders

Companies Compete for Global Talent

A worldwide “war for talent” is being waged, and enterprises that manage their global talent pool well are marching ahead. Most multinational corporations now insist that high-potential executives gain global experience by working in other countries, and they have made international mobility a prerequisite for senior leadership positions. Some of the global economy’s most familiar players – including Google, Microsoft, Alcoa, Clorox, Coca-Cola, McDonald’s, Pepsi, and Pfizer – have immigrant CEOs. There is high demand for data scientists, software engineers, programmers, and cloud computing experts, not just at software firms and traditional tech powerhouses like IBM and Cisco, but also in retail companies and financial firms, leading companies and municipalities to become increasingly aggressive in how they recruit new workers.

Governments is also getting in on the act. School districts, cities—even entire countries—are competing to poach employees from each other by offering targeted financial incentives including higher salaries and tax breaks. Government officials increasingly realize the speed of technological change raises the chances of being left behind. The race for talent, it turns out, has also become something of a public function.

How Will You Identify, Engage and Attract Global Talent?

Countries Compete for HNWI

The global economy seems to be taking an optimistic outlook after treading cautiously for close to a decade. The total wealth of high net worth individuals (HNWIs) worldwide has crossed $70 trillion for the first, according to the World Wealth Report 2018 (WWR), released by Capegemini. HNWI wealth grew by 10.6 percent in 2017, making it the sixth consecutive year that their wealth has grown. HNWI wealth grew by 10.6 percent in 2017, making it the sixth consecutive year that their wealth has grown. According to the report, close to 1.6 million HNWIs were added to global economy. Close to 75 percent of these new HNWIs came from the Asia-Pacific and North America, with the US, Japan, Germany and China, representing 61.2 percent of the global HNWI population in 2017. They also added $4.6 trillion in new HNWI wealth. According to the report, close to 1.6 million HNWIs were added to global economy. Close to 75 percent of these new HNWIs came from the Asia-Pacific and North America, with the US, Japan, Germany and China, representing 61.2 percent of the global HNWI population in 2017. They also added $4.6 trillion in new HNWI wealth.